Career Search: The road to operating an equine facility

by Autumn Jones, marketing director

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Autumn Jones

The general public says that the little girl’s wish to have a pony is just a stage that will soon expire before she moves on to the next fad of her young mind. Many may find this theory to be true, but when you’re the young girl who grew up surrounded by ponies, it’s no longer a stage.

As a child, I was constantly watching my parents work together to train the unruly horses which would be sent to our barn for a 30 day training session. As I grew older and situations began to change, I became the one who would help my father train these horses which would come in for a multitude of reasons and at many different ages and training levels.

This experience training horses with my father further fueled my passion to make a career in the horse industry and led me to the University of Findlay in Findlay, Ohio.

After visiting the campus and barns in the spring of my sophomore year, I was in love. My plan was to attend the school as a double major in Equine Business Management and Equine Western Studies. After much thought, I decided that I didn’t want to spend $50,000 a year on schooling and have to drive five hours to get there.

I began looking into other schools and talking to many people. All applications of business stem from a regular business management degree. This degree would give me many job openings as well as teach me how to properly operate a successful business, which I could apply while operating my equine facility. There is also a predicted increase in the business management jobs of 151,100 from 2014-2024 according to the U.S. Bureau and Labor Statistics, as well as a median annual wage of $99,310 in May 2016.

As of right now, I have not applied to any colleges. Over the winter months, I plan to tour colleges on a more local level such as Slippery Rock, Edinboro, and Clarion, which all have equestrian teams. The local aspect would allow me to get a head start on my business at home while I am still in school.

If you have any questions about the business management field or equine businesses, please feel free to email me at autjones@psdmail.org.

 

Saegertown continues its tradition of ‘Fifth Quarter’ at Common Grounds

by Kaitlyn Kozalla, staff writer

From big cities to small towns, there are places for kids to hangout and have fun. That place for our small town is known as Common Grounds. Several years ago this fun- filled hangout emerged in Saegertown, and from that day forward it’s been the place to go every Friday from 7-10 after the football games. After Saegertown’s homecoming game on Oct. 13, “Fifth Quarter”  was extended from 10 to 11, and the time was filled with activities, good food, and all around positivity. At 9 p.m. was the usual “Nine at Nine” which is talking about bettering lives with religion and belief, and usually an inspirational speaker.

Located at 19473 Grotto Lane, Common Grounds is truly a special place. At the end of the evening, everyone gathered for a photo of all the smiling faces who attended that night. “It provides a little extra time to hang out with your friends after the football game,” said senior Bailey Kozalla. “It’s a great positive environment.”
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Career search: A look into speech-language pathology and audiology

by Kaity Gage, design editor

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Kaity Gage

When a family member can’t pronounce their “r’s”, “th’s”, or even has a hard time speaking or swallowing due to a recent stroke, that is when it is time to go see a Speech Pathologist.  

Speech pathologists are often known as speech therapists. They’re the ones who can diagnose and treat disabilities involving speech, voice, language, communication and swallowing disorders.

From a young age, I knew that I wanted to help people. Watching my brother go through therapy when he was younger inspired me to explore the different therapy fields. I eventually learned about speech pathologists and the role they play in helping their communities.

To be a licensed speech pathologist, you must obtain your master’s degree in speech-language pathology and audiology. The salaries vary between states and areas in which the therapists are working, but there is an excellent job outlook for these experts. The rate is currently at a 21 percent job increase projected from 2014-2024 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

This past summer I spent some time researching colleges that offered the master’s degree for speech pathology and that is when I found Clarion University of Pennsylvania. In August I toured their campus and fell in love with the facilities and the professors. I received excellent treatment from everyone I met, so I decided to submit my application that day. After waiting patiently for two weeks, I learned that I was accepted into Clarion. Now I am an incredibly excited senior who looks forward to my future schooling, and I am more than ready to go into the world and help those who need my services.

If you are interested in becoming a speech pathologist, have any questions about this profession, or would like to know more about Clarion’s Speech Pathology program, please email me at kagage@psdmail.org or visit Clarion’s website for more information about their program.

(Career search will be an ongoing feature this year as staff members share explorations of their future plans.)

Seniors hyped for graduation parties

by Kaitlyn Walsh, features editor

For most students, summer means doing absolutely nothing and being the human equivalent of a slug for three months. But for seniors, summer means moving out and figuring out future plans. Somewhere in-between all of this madness, a graduation party is thrown for everyone to come and celebrate all of your high school and future accomplishments and goals.

Most people are having their graduation parties at their houses.

“I chose to have it at my house because we have a large backyard, and its located close to the school. It’s also easier to have it there than to go somewhere else”, said Rachel Barner.

However, this isn’t the only alternative. Many people are choosing to have their parties elsewhere. For example, Anna Swartout will be holding her celebration at Stainbrook Park.

“It’s a really pretty spot by the creek and it has a volleyball net for something to do,” Swartout said.

We all know that a party isn’t a party without a lot of food and drinks. Soda and some kind of protein are obviously essential to any outdoor party, but some people like to make their own variations on what they make. Kayla Justus decided to have German meatballs as the main dish at her party.

“They’re delicious, they represent my heritage, and it is a symbol of good luck for the future,” Justus said.

Having normal food is also just as good. Staples such as burgers, hot dogs, and fried chicken are a hit with all ages and appetites. However you choose to do your graduation party is up to you, and the possibilities are endless