Teachers’ hidden talents: Motocross has opened doors for Mr. Nahay

by Erik Murphy, website editor

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Saegertown technology teacher George Nahay

Mr. George Nahay has been racing motocross for years. The Saegertown technology education teacher has been riding dirt bikes since age 10 and racing since age 15 at local venues including the TV Land MX track in Pierpont, Ohio and the Maple Shade MX track in Sugar Grove, Pa.

“As a kid, I used to imagine myself riding alongside the school bus on a dirt bike,” Nahay said as he explained his inspiration for picking up the sport. His father responded to his vision by purchasing Nahay his first dirt bike.

He has a significant background in motocross and technology education as a whole. When he lived in North Carolina, he helped operate the Wide Open Motocross Park which was open to the public every Saturday and Sunday. Nahay was responsible for building the jumps on the track, grooming the track, and driving a 2,000-gallon water truck. This experience opened several doors.

One of his friends started a tactical driving company called American Offroad, which specializes in teaching offensive and defensive driving skills for combat situations, mainly to military groups. Nahay worked with them for a fair bit of time before moving to Pennsylvania, and he still visits annually.

 

He even thought about taking a permanent job in the field. “I considered teaching at a motocross training facility in South Carolina (Club MX) for riders aspiring to be professional racers. These riders are from all over the country and range in age from 12-18. During the day they train as professional athletes. In the evenings they take online classes on their own often without parents or teachers to guide them.  I worked with some of the kids individually as a tutor, but decided not to quit my job to teach there full time,” Nahay said.

Nahay continues to race during summer breaks, and he still enjoys the benefits of all his motocross experiences. He shared that he found his passion for working in technology education by fixing parts on dirt bikes.

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