Career search: A look into speech-language pathology and audiology

by Kaity Gage, design editor

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Kaity Gage

When a family member can’t pronounce their “r’s”, “th’s”, or even has a hard time speaking or swallowing due to a recent stroke, that is when it is time to go see a Speech Pathologist.  

Speech pathologists are often known as speech therapists. They’re the ones who can diagnose and treat disabilities involving speech, voice, language, communication and swallowing disorders.

From a young age, I knew that I wanted to help people. Watching my brother go through therapy when he was younger inspired me to explore the different therapy fields. I eventually learned about speech pathologists and the role they play in helping their communities.

To be a licensed speech pathologist, you must obtain your master’s degree in speech-language pathology and audiology. The salaries vary between states and areas in which the therapists are working, but there is an excellent job outlook for these experts. The rate is currently at a 21 percent job increase projected from 2014-2024 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

This past summer I spent some time researching colleges that offered the master’s degree for speech pathology and that is when I found Clarion University of Pennsylvania. In August I toured their campus and fell in love with the facilities and the professors. I received excellent treatment from everyone I met, so I decided to submit my application that day. After waiting patiently for two weeks, I learned that I was accepted into Clarion. Now I am an incredibly excited senior who looks forward to my future schooling, and I am more than ready to go into the world and help those who need my services.

If you are interested in becoming a speech pathologist, have any questions about this profession, or would like to know more about Clarion’s Speech Pathology program, please email me at kagage@psdmail.org or visit Clarion’s website for more information about their program.

(Career search will be an ongoing feature this year as staff members share explorations of their future plans.)

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