Where does the money go?- Professional athletes and fines of misconduct

By Zack Posego, website editor and Nick Bradley, website editor

In 2002, the New York Knicks fined one of its players, Latrell Sprewell, $250,000 for failing to report a hand injury to his team before the beginning of the official season. This remains the largest fine given to a player by their own team in history, and it raises the question… where does that money go?

Most professional sport leagues and associations have different standards for fining their players. The NFL is considered one of the harshest afflicters of these punishments, sometimes cashing in as much has 260,000 in a single week from its players

Most professional sport athletic organizations have different standards for fining their players. The NFL is considered one of the harshest afflicters of these punishments, sometimes cashing in as much as $260,000 in a single week from its players

“I think that the money goes back into the team and organization”, said junior Jude Mattocks. While this question remains broad when asked about all professional athletic organizations in general, most donate these funds to various charities.

Player fine proceeds from the National Basketball Association (NBA) are split between the NBA itself and The Players’ Association: both of these donate most of this money to charity. The National Football League (NFL) give their proceeds to the Players Assistance Trust (an organization that gives money to athletes and their families in times of crisis), as well as charities supporting youth, education, and sports-related medical research. National Hockey League (NHL) player fines go to the Players’ Emergency Assistance Fund, a group that helps cash-strapped former pro-hockey players with financial troubles.

“I think it’s right that most of that money is being donated toward charities,” said freshman Eli Draa.

While it’s true that a large portion of these funds are being donated to charitable foundations, a question arises as to whether or not it is ethical to fine professional atheletes large sums of money for misconduct. Math teacher Mrs. Houck said, “I do not think they should misbehave, but if they want to act childish, then they should be fined.”

Moral or not, money from the misbehavior of these professional athletes is a great source of income for respectable charities, and teaches a lesson to these players who believe they are above the rules.

If you would like to follow the money, visit: This site 

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